Connect with us

Positive Thinking People and Good News

Positive Thinking People and Good News

Positive news Storm Jorge: New floods ‘won’t be as extreme’


Good News

Positive news Storm Jorge: New floods ‘won’t be as extreme’

Image copyright Dave Throup Image caption Dave Throup, from the Environment Agency, said there was “miles and miles of water” on the Severn’s floodplains south of Worcester Further floods are expected in parts of the West Midlands after Storm Jorge, the Environment Agency (EA) has said.However, these floods will be “less extreme” than those seen…

Positive news Storm Jorge: New floods ‘won’t be as extreme’

Positive news

positive news Flooded plains in south Worcestershire

Image copyright
Dave Throup

Image caption

Dave Throup, from the Environment Agency, said there was “miles and miles of water” on the Severn’s floodplains south of Worcester

Further floods are expected in parts of the West Midlands after Storm Jorge, the Environment Agency (EA) has said.

However, these floods will be “less extreme” than those seen along the River Severn earlier in the week.

Hundreds of homes were evacuated and there were two severe flood warnings in Shropshire, meaning a danger to life.

Dave Throup, from the EA, said the river was due to peak overnight and into Monday but would be up to a metre below the levels seen previously.

Flood defences in Ironbridge that were damaged by the deluge are “good to go,” he added.

Image copyright
PA Media

Image caption

“Herculean efforts” saw damaged flood defences in Ironbridge repaired in time for Storm Jorge

The temporary barriers were pushed back by up to two metres due to the force of the water on Wednesday, meaning water was able to seep beneath them.

The EA said at nearby Buildwas 300 tonnes of water was flowing through the Severn every second on Sunday morning and water levels were starting to rise.

An average of 202.1mm rainfall fell last month, data from the Met Office shows, making it the wettest February since records began.

Image copyright
PA Media

Image caption

River levels along the Severn will be high but not as “extreme” as earlier in the week

The Severn is expected to peak in Shrewsbury overnight with the peak moving downstream through Monday and Tuesday.

The EA, expects the river to peak at up to 5.7m in Ironbridge on Monday afternoon – one metre less than the levels it reached on Wednesday.

“It’s still very high but not the absolutely extreme levels we saw this week,” Mr Throup said.

The river will get “high enough to be on our defences,” he added, and there are still flood warnings in place.

In Bewdley, Worcestershire, where flood defences were overtopped on Tuesday, the river is expected to reach its highest peak on Tuesday morning at around 4.5m.

Image copyright
PA Media

Image caption

Residents in Ironbridge have been able to return home after the “extreme” flooding

Vicki Gaffney’s home in Tenbury Wells, which is along the River Teme, is one of more than 100 that was flooded in the town earlier this week.

“We’ve just been given the very depressing news that we’ve got a timeline of about six to nine months to be back in the house,” she said. “I’m finding that really hard.”

Image copyright
PA Media

Image caption

Tenbury Wells was flooded during Storm Dennis and has no defences to protect it

The town has no flood defences and Ms Gaffney said that has to change. Her thoughts were echoed by Olivia and Stephen Higgins who run a shop on the high street.

“You feel totally alone,” Ms Higgins said. “We’re no less important than the bigger towns that flood, but that’s how we’re made to feel – bottom of the list.”

Real Life. Real News. Real Voices

Help us tell more of the stories that matter

Become a founding member

Image copyright
PA Media

Image caption

Residents in Bewdley had to be rescued from floods after the Severn overtopped defences on Tuesday

In Worcester, the EA said “everything is expected to stay stable” – levels aren’t looking likely to increase but nor is the river expected to go down “until probably mid week”.

“It is very high water levels,” Mr Throup said, but the city is coping and “fully open for business”.

Along the River Wye in Herefordshire, levels have peaked about a metre and a half below what was recorded earlier in the week.

Image copyright
Dave Throup

Image caption

Despite incredible amounts of water, Upton-upon-Severn is “fully open,” Mr Throup said

“I don’t think that’s going to cause too many problems,” Mr Throup said.

“We’re hoping for the best during this week but we’ll be monitoring the situation closely.”

Follow BBC West Midlands on Facebook, on Twitter, and sign up for local news updates direct to your phone.


Have you been affected by the floods? Share your experiences by emailing haveyoursay@bbc.co.uk.

Please include a contact number if you are willing to speak to a BBC journalist. You can also contact us in the following ways:

Subscribe to the newsletter news

We hate SPAM and promise to keep your email address safe

Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Top Stories

To Top