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Positive news George Washington’s favorite cologne still sold by original fragrance company, uses the same formula


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Positive news George Washington’s favorite cologne still sold by original fragrance company, uses the same formula

After shuttering its 84-year-old store in the Barclay Hotel in 2010, Caswell-Massey opened its new brick-and-mortar location at 312 Bowery in New York at the end of October. (Caswell-Massey)If it’s good enough for a founding father …Caswell-Massey is the fragrance and apothecary brand that’s been making some of the world’s biggest celebrities and historical figures smell…

Positive news George Washington’s favorite cologne still sold by original fragrance company, uses the same formula

Positive news

positive news After shuttering its 84-year-old store in the Barclay Hotel in 2010, Caswell-Massey opened its new brick-and-mortar location at 312 Bowery in New York at the end of October.

After shuttering its 84-year-old store in the Barclay Hotel in 2010, Caswell-Massey opened its new brick-and-mortar location at 312 Bowery in New York at the end of October.
(Caswell-Massey)

If it’s good enough for a founding father …

Caswell-Massey is the fragrance and apothecary brand that’s been making some of the world’s biggest celebrities and historical figures smell amazing since 1752.

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But while the Newport-founded company may be coming up on its 268th year of business, its CEO, Nicolas Arauz, insists they’ve only just gotten started scenting the masses. After shuttering its 84-year-old store in the Barclay Hotel in 2010, Caswell-Massey opened its new brick-and-mortar location at 312 Bowery at the end of October.

Of the brand’s biggest presidential fan, Arauz told Page Six Style, “We always joke that he was our first influencer: George Washington.”

positive news General George Washington (center) inspects the French battery on the opening day of the siege of Yorktown, October 1781. Lithograph by Zogbaum published in 1881.

General George Washington (center) inspects the French battery on the opening day of the siege of Yorktown, October 1781. Lithograph by Zogbaum published in 1881.
(Photo by Interim Archives/Getty Images)

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“[Washington] came to the shop in Newport on a business trip to meet [Marquis de] Lafayette,” he explained. “From everything we know, Dr. William Hunter — who founded the brand — and George Washington both really wanted to show off how European the colonies were, so that’s why Dr. Hunter was making perfumes, to have Newport feel less like a pirate town and a little more like a real cosmopolitan place. I think Washington was also really eager to show off that we weren’t a backwoods anymore and that we were a sort of worldly, global, up-and-coming civilization. So, I think they must have hit it off a little bit.”

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America’s first POTUS used Hunter’s “Formula Number Six Toilette Water,” and liked it so much, he gifted it to others.

“Lafayette, when he came back to the States in the early 1800s, visited the shop on his grand tour and talked about how this was the fragrance George Washington had given him and he came back to buy some more,” Arauz said. “So because they were both opinion leaders, it really did boost awareness of the brand, and that was used as one of the calling cards of the brand when they came to New York in the 1850s.”

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While Caswell-Massey has updated the formulation of the iconic scent quite a bit since its invention, swapping out animal-based ingredients for plant-based and molecular ones, the brand still uses the original recipe as the basis to produce its “Supernatural Number Six” scent ($225), which it counts as a bestseller.

Read the complete article on the New York Post.

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